LGBTQ v Religious Rights?: The 2015 Kurz Chair public event

As the Herbert Kurz Chair in Constitutional Rights at Brooklyn College, I have the opportunity to create public programming for the College community and general public about the possibilities and limits of using the U.S. Constitution to protect politically vulnerable minority groups.  In past years, I have taken on the topics of Stop and Frisk, school desegregation, and last year, immigration reform.  Consistent with past practice, I bring in an outside expert and also tap Brooklyn College's own talented faculty.  This year, I take on the issue of LGBTQ versus religious rights.

LGBTQ vs. Religious rights?

The media casts these rights as in opposition, but is this the only way these issues can be framed?

Having overcome anti-sodomy laws, overturned the military’s Don’t-Ask-Don’t-Tell policy, and achieved marriage equality, the LGBTQ movement is at a crossroads.  Despite the Supreme Court’s recent landmark ruling in Obergefell v Hodges (2015), the marriage equality case, sexual orientation as a category, unlike race, sex, and gender, has not been elevated to a protected class. The consequence is that LGBTQ citizens may still be open to discrimination in employment, housing, adoption, and other areas of public and private life.

At the same time, the United States has a long and proud history of respecting the free exercise of religion.  Are we as a nation prepared to force religious persons to act against their sincere and deeply held religious beliefs and conscience? How do we balance LGBTQ claims to equal treatment against those claiming religious freedom? Are these two sets of claims mutually exclusive?  Is there any way to reconcile them that would be fair or acceptable to both? 

WHO:  Helping us sort through these questions are one visitor and one of Brooklyn College's own.

Steve Sanders of the Indiana University's School of Law, a nationally recognized expert on constitutional law and the legal issues of same sex couples and their families, conflict of laws, federalism, and academic freedom.  He has also argued a case before the Supreme Court.

Paisley Currah, a political scientist and pioneer in the field ofsexuality and gender studies and founding co-editor of TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly.  His areas of expertise are in LGBT studies, queer legal theory, public policy, and political theory.  

WHEN:   Monday, October 26, 2015, from 11am -12:30PM  

WHERE:  Woody Tanger Auditorium, inside the Brooklyn College Library (Bldg #13 on the map)